Ep 0008 – What if today were the last day of your life? Remembering Unc

Laurie's legs in a hammock
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I reverse the process from last episode and begin from my hammock.

Podcast Recap

I wrestle with the unexpected death of my uncle as I journey from the comfort of my hammock back up the mountain to ponder, ‘What if today were the last day of my life’?

Mentioned

Laurie’s Sparkpeople team for listeners of the podcast and for those dealing with compulsive overeating, binge eating, or emotional eating issues who’d like support. – Closed 10/22/14 due to lack of participation

Deukmejian Wilderness Park

On Amazon.com (USA)
Black Diamond Trail Back Trek Poles

Leave your comments, questions, feelings and stories on Laurie’s podcast voicemail hotline – 206-350-6445.

Credits

Host: Laurie Weaver

Main Theme: I’m Letting Go by Josh Woodward from The Simple Life Part 1

I’m Letting Go (Josh Woodward) / CC BY 3.0

Resource of the day

The Grief Monster a touching and thought-provoking blog post by author, Shannon Cutts where she quotes Dr. Daniel Siegel’s The Mindful Brain. In his chapter on “Stress and Suffering”, Siegel writes, “When the mind grasps onto preconceived ideas it creates a tension within the mind between what is and what “should be”. This tension creates stress and leads to suffering.”
Comments box:

4 thoughts on “Ep 0008 – What if today were the last day of your life? Remembering Unc

  1. Cheryl Carter

    Morning, Laurie. I was struck this morning by two words you used in the podcast today: grief and regret. Before I listened I would probably have lumped them in the same batter. But I realized as I stood here in the kitchen getting ready to fix breakfast that there IS a chasm between between them, a period of time we have BEFORE regret becomes grief. And in a way, maybe that’s part of the message of your podcast. We have time to keep the regret for past failures from turning into grief. I thought that was an amazingly encouraging message. Good job!

    Reply
    1. Laurie@CompulsiveOvereatingDiary Post author

      I feel good that you got me gal! That was one of my points. Death always clarifies things, I think. When my uncle passed it really showed me that my life was up to me and if I don’t like how it is going, it’s up to me to change it. And that includes reaching out to others, like fantastic friends like you πŸ™‚

      Reply
  2. Suz

    Wow, I just lost everything I typed somehow by hitting a magic obliterating combination of keystrokes.
    Not sure I remember all I typed.
    Dang it.
    But, I said that I was so happy you had someone like your uncle in your life. I had always wished I had someone like that in the family. Someone I could count on and talk to, someone who I could confide in and who would tell me I was going to be okay, and that I was good and lovable just the way I was. Someone who would give me a hug and just accept me, as-is.
    That’s so important.
    Grief and regret are hard for me to cope with. They are hard to face, hard to resolve and live with. Grief and regret over people and relationships, and the life one has led or the life one wishes they would have or could have led.
    I still owe letters to people who have passed away.

    Here is an old-fashioned poem I have always liked. It’s relevant, if a bit dark; it’s still sweet. I think the author was J. A. Egerton.

    “Tell Him So”

    If you have a word of cheer
    That may light the pathway drear,
    Of a brother pilgrim here,
    Let him know.
    Show him you appreciate
    What he does, and do not wait
    Till the heavy hand of fate
    Lays him low.
    If your heart contains a thought
    That will brighter make his lot,
    Then, in mercy, hide it not;
    Tell him so.

    Bide not till the end of all
    Carries him beyond recall
    When beside his sable pall
    To avow
    Your affection and acclaim
    To do honor to his name
    And to place the wreath of fame
    On his brow.
    Rather speak to him to-day;
    For the things you have to say
    May assist him on his way :
    Tell him now.

    Life is hard enough at best:
    But the love that is expressed
    Makes it a pathway blest
    To our feet;
    And the troubles that we share
    Seem the easier to bear,
    Smile upon your neighbor’s care,
    As you greet.
    Rough and stony are our ways,
    Dark and dreary are our days;
    But another’s love and praise
    Make them sweet.

    Wait not till your friend is dead
    Ere your compliments be said;
    For the spirit that has fled,
    If it know,
    Does not need to speed it on
    Our poor praise; where it has gone
    Love’s eternal golden dawn
    Is aglow.
    But unto our brother here
    That poor praise is very dear;
    If you’ve any word of cheer
    Tell him so.

    Reply
    1. Laurie@CompulsiveOvereatingDiary Post author

      But, I said that I was so happy you had someone like your uncle in your life. I had always wished I had someone like that in the family. Someone I could count on and talk to, someone who I could confide in and who would tell me I was going to be okay, and that I was good and lovable just the way I was. Someone who would give me a hug and just accept me, as-is.
      That’s so important.

      Suz, your size and your experience with food is not everything you are. You have had pain and joy and everything in between, because you are human. I am really bitchy sometimes, I’m messy, I talk too much. I don’t like to clean, but I like a clean house. But I’m also caring, funny, and have a good voice, I guess. I’m loving and even if I have a big bottom, I have pretty hair (when I remember to comb it). I KNOW that you are a variety of attributes too, and all of them are the special recipe that makes you, you. Hugs, Hugs, Hugs

      Reply

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